logo: live from Todessa

Innocent Colors
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 06

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #6

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Veronica Lake, Vittorio Mussolini, Georg Türke, Anneliese Uhlig, Ezra Pound / Canto XLV

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Duck and Cover
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 05

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #5

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Bert the Turtle

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The Global Player
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 04

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #4

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
archive.org, Velimir Khlebnikov – The Radio of the Future (1921)

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The President´s Address
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 03

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #3

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Benito Mussolini

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Space Monkey
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 02

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #2

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Adorno/Horkheimer

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Leader News
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 01

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #1

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org

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REFUGIUM

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN
Episode 15

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  REFUGIUM  h e r e  (p.141 – 150)

Topics
Das Haus des Seins, Baba Yaga

Das Haus des Seins
Das Denken vollbringt den Bezug des Seins zum Wesen des Menschen. Es macht und bewirkt diesen Bezug nicht. Das Denken bringt ihn nur als das, was ihm selbst vom Sein übergeben ist, dem Sein dar. Dieses Darbieten besteht darin, daß im Denken das Sein zur Sprache kommt. Die Sprache ist das Haus des Seins. In ihrer Behausung wohnt der Mensch. Die Denkenden und Dichtenden sind die Wächter dieser Behausung. Ihr Wachen ist das Vollbringen der Offenbarkeit des Seins, insofern sie diese durch ihr Sagen zur Sprache bringen und in der Sprache aufbewahren. Das Denken wird nicht erst dadurch zur Aktion, daß von ihm eine Wirkung ausgeht oder daß es angewendet wird. Das Denken handelt, indem es denkt. Dieses Handeln ist vermutlich das Einfachste und zugleich Höchste, weil es den Bezug des Seins zum Menschen angeht.

Heidegger: Brief über den Humanismus. 1947

Thinking accomplishes the relation of being to the essence of the human being. It does not make or cause the relation. Thinking brings this relation to being solely as something handed over to thought itself from being. Such offering consists in the fact that in thinking being comes to language. Language is the house of being. In its home human beings dwell. Those who think and those who create with words are the guardians of this home. Their guardianship accomplishes the manifestation of being insofar as they bring this manifestation to language and preserve it in language through their saying. Thinking does not become action only because some effect issues from it or because it is applied. Thinking acts insofar as it thinks. Such action ispresumably the simplest and at the same time the highest because it concerns the relation of being to humans.

Letter on “Humanism”
Translated by Frank A. Capuzzi’

Baba Yaga
Baba-Yaga (Russian: Баба Яга) in Russian folklore, an ogress who steals, cooks, and eats her victims, usually children. A guardian of the fountains of the water of life, she lives with two or three sisters (all known as Baba-Yaga) in a forest hut which spins continually on birds’ legs; her fence is topped with human skulls. Baba-Yaga can ride through the air—in an iron kettle or in a mortar that she drives with a pestle—creating tempests as she goes. She often accompanies Death on his travels, devouring newly released souls.
Encyclopaedia Britannica

Languages / scripts used: English, French, German, Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, Heidegger, Mussorgsky, Richter

GRAPHÈMES

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN
Episode 14

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  GRAPFÈMES  h e r e  (p.133 – 140)

Topics
Proto-Elamite, Capriccio

Proto-Elamite
Proto-Elamite uses no word-dividers, and the entries are not arranged in boxes. In actuality, a proto-Elamite text is arranged sequentially and not in any visible order of hierarchies. This in-line representation of the entries is quite different from all other early writing systems, and it may carry certain elements of language coding (cf. Damerow 1999, 7). The entries can cover all surfaces, and can run from one line to the next and from one surface onto the next. Each entry consists of a string of graphemes and a numerical notation. Most of the strings of signs in the proto-Elamite corpus are of modest length (2 – 6 signs), but some longer strings exist.
The header and subscript are not followed by numerical notations. In conventioinal transliterations of proto-Elamite texts, each entry is given its own line-number, and its two constituent parts are separated by a comma. As a rule the right edge is considered part of the obverse, and only the first entry to start on the reverse is numbered as belonging to the reverse. When the text of the obverse runs onto the reverse, that segment of the reverse is called column 1, the segment holding the total (if present) is called column 2. If there is no spill-over from the obverse the total (if present) is coded reverse, column 1. Normally, the tablet is rotated 180 degrees on its horizontal axis to write the total (deviations occur), and 180 degrees around its vertical axis for a continuation of the text.
Complex Graphemes in Proto-Elamite / Jacob L. Dahl

Capriccio
In the plastic arts, Capriccio is generally an architectural fantasy, where buildings, archaeological remains, ruins and other architectural elements are composed of combinations of real and fantastic elements arranged according to the idiosyncratic criteria of the artist. Traditionally, caprice used to be a subgenre of landscape painting, but with the passage of time it was also used to designate other types of works in which fantasy prevails.

The whim or “veduta ideata” in Venetian painting between the end of the seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth century is configured as a real genre, that is as the art of composing the landscape through the free combination of real or fantastic architectural elements, ruins of antiquity reworked, figures and figures, according to a variety of declinations ranging from the grotesque to the visionary, from the picturesque all’elegìaco.

In the Italian art historian Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574), the term capriccio refers to the traits of puzzling fantasy testifying to the originality of a painter. Speaking of Filippino Lippi, he emphasizes the “strani capricci che egli espress nella pittura” (the “strange caprices that he expresses in his paintings”). Raffaello Borghini (Il Riposo, 15844) distinguishes between an inspiration drawn from others and that intrinsic to the artist: a suo capriccio.

As early as the 17th century, Viviano Codazzi, in Rome, produced architectural paintings, which represent imaginary ruins, as can be seen in his architectural Fantasies of the Pitti Palace.

Towards the end of the seventeenth century, Philip Baldinucci (Vocabolario dell’arte del disegno, 16815) finally defined capriccio as a work born from the spontaneous imagination of the painter (improvvisa). The meaning of caprice becomes metonymic by referring to the work itself, not to the whimsical idea that produced it.
Golden Age:
Early practitioners of the genre who made the genre popular in mid-17th century Rome included Alessandro Salucci and Viviano Codazzi. The artists represent two different approaches to the genre: Codazzi’s capricci were more realistic than those of Salucci who showed more creativity and liberty in his approach by rearranging Roman monuments to fit his compositional objectives. The ‘quadratture’ frescoes of Agostino Tassi and the urban views of Claude Lorrain and Herman van Swanevelt, which he saw in Rome, may have stimulated Viviano Codazzi to start painting capricci.

This genre was perfected[citation needed] by Marco Ricci (1676–1730) but its best-known proponent was the artist Giovanni Paolo Pannini (1691–1765). This style was extended in the 1740s by Canaletto in his etched vedute ideali, and works by Piranesi and his imitators.
In the eighteenth century, the term takes on the particular meaning of fictional landscape among vedute painters. In the 1720s, Marco Ricci (1676-1730) drew numerous paintings and prints depicting landscapes with ruins and staffing. In Rome, Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765) is a forerunner of the neo-classical movement with its views that depict the city and scenes of ancient ruins, in which are incorporated non-existent details but contributing to the atmosphere evoked. In Venice the genre of capricci is especially appreciated by the Venetians themselves, amused by the painter’s ingenious play with architecture. In the 1740s, Canaletto published a series of capricci prints, the Vedute Ideals.

Michele Marieschi (1710-1743) lends itself to the freedoms of capriccio with the representation of the staircase of an inner palace courtyard. It is based on at least thirteen versions of motifs inspired by Marco Ricci’s drawings of stage sets to give his composition a theatrical perspective. His Capriccio con edificio gotico ed obelisco (1741) shows a fantasized Venice, with a Gothic portico and an obelisk pointing to a pier, and in the background, reliefs of hills and mountains leaning against waterside houses.

The term can be used more broadly for other works with a strong element of fantasy. The Capricci, an influential series of etchings by Gianbattista Tiepolo (1730s?, published in 1743), reduced the architectural elements to chunks of classical statuary and ruins, among which small groups made up of a cast of exotic and elegant figures of soldiers, philosophers and beautiful young people go about their enigmatic business. No individual titles help to explain these works; mood and style are everything. A later series was called Scherzi di fantasia – “Fantastic Sketches”. His son Domenico Tiepolo was among those who imitated these prints, often using the term in titles.

Goya’s series of eighty prints Los Caprichos, and the last group of prints in his series The Disasters of War, which he called “caprichos enfáticos” (“emphatic caprices”), are far from the spirit of light-hearted fantasy the term usually suggests. They take Tiepolo’s format of a group of figures, now drawn from contemporary Spanish life, and are a series of savage satires and comments on its absurdity, only partly explicated by short titles.

Capricci, series of etchings by Giambattista Tiepolo (1743), reduce the architectural elements to pieces of classical statuary and ruins, among which small groups – soldiers, philosophers, young people – conduct their business. No individual titles explain these works. A later series is called Scherzi di Fantasia, “Fantastic Drawings”.

The series of 80 prints of Francisco de Goya, Los caprichos, and the last set of his Disasters of the war that names caprichos enfáticos (“emphatic whims”), take again the format of the groups of personages initiated by Tiepolo, placed in the Contemporary Spanish life, to produce a succession of satires and comments on his nonsense, only partially explained by their short title.

Later examples include A Tribute to Sir Christopher Wren (circa 1838) and A Professor’s Dream by Charles Robert Cockerell, and Joseph Gandy’s Public and Private Buildings Executed by Sir John Soane (1818).

In architecture, a whim is an extravagant, frivolous or funny building, designed more as an artistic expression than for practical purposes. However, very few whims were originally completely devoid of practical utility: usually, over time, they stopped being used, as in the case of hunting towers.

The whims are usually found in the parks and on the land surrounding large villas and castles. Some have been deliberately built to look in ruins. The whims were particularly in vogue between the late sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Nowadays theme parks and world fairs often contain buildings similar to whims (just to give an example, the gigantic fairytale castle at Disneyland); these structures, however, are built for the purpose of attracting and entertaining visitors.

Languages / scripts used: Proto-Elamite, English, French, German, Russian

Acknowledgements
Jacob L. Dahl

THE TABLET OF DESTINIES VI: UHRN.TXT

Poems in Posthuman Akkadian
EPISODE 12/6

Episode 12/1 – NAM, FATE
Episode 12/2 – MAGNETAR.MELAMMU
Episode 12/3 – UHRN.MONDe
Episode 12/4 – NAM.TXT
Episode 12/5 – MELAMMU.TXT

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  THE TABLET OF DESTINIES  h e r e  (p.104 – 133)

Topics
Ninurta, The Tablet of Destinies, Light-Cone, Boltzmann Brain, Entropy, Vacuum Structure, Arrow of Time

…under the light cone of Zeit
lies a reverse iconic night…

from UHRN.MONDe / PPA

Light Cone
In special and general relativity, a light cone is the path that a flash of light, emanating from a single event (localized to a single point in space and a single moment in time) and traveling in all directions, would take through spacetime.

If one imagines the light confined to a two-dimensional plane, the light from the flash spreads out in a circle after the event E occurs, and if we graph the growing circle with the vertical axis of the graph representing time, the result is a cone, known as the future light cone. The past light cone behaves like the future light cone in reverse, a circle which contracts in radius at the speed of light until it converges to a point at the exact position and time of the event E. In reality, there are three space dimensions, so the light would actually form an expanding or contracting sphere in threedimensional (3D) space rather than a circle in 2D, and the light cone would actually be a four-dimensional version of a cone whose cross-sections form 3D spheres (analogous to a normal three-dimensional cone whose cross-sections form 2D circles), but the concept is easier to visualize with the number of spatial dimensions reduced from three to two.
This view of special relativity was first proposed by Albert Einstein’s former professor Hermann Minkowski and is known as Minkowski space. The purpose was to create an invariant spacetime for all observers. To uphold causality, Minkowski restricted spacetime to non-Euclidean hyperbolic geometry. Because signals and other causal influences cannot travel faster than light (see special relativity), the light cone plays an essential role in defining the concept of causality: for a given event E, the set of events that lie on or inside the past light cone of E would also be the set of all events that could send a signal that would have time to reach E and influence it in some way. For example, at a time ten years before E, if we consider the set of all events in the past light cone of E which occur at that time, the result would be a sphere (2D: disk) with a radius of ten light-years centered on the position where E will occur. So, any point on or inside the sphere could send a signal moving at the speed of light or slower that would have time to influence the event E, while points outside the sphere at that moment would not be able to have any causal influence on E. Likewise, the set of events that lie on or inside the future light cone of E would also be the set of events that could receive a signal sent out from the position and time of E, so the future light cone contains all the events that could potentially be causally influenced by E. Events which lie neither in the past or future light cone of E cannot influence or be influenced by E in relativity.

…In flat spacetime, the future light cone of an event is the boundary of its causal future and its past light cone is the boundary of its causal past. In a curved spacetime, assuming spacetime is globally hyperbolic, it is still true that the future light cone of an event includes the boundary of its causal future (and similarly for the past). However gravitational lensing can cause part of the light cone to fold in on itself, in such a way that part of the cone is strictly inside the causal future (or past), and not on the boundary. Light cones also cannot all be tilted so that they are ‘parallel’; this reflects the fact that the spacetime is curved and is essentially different from Minkowski space. In vacuum regions (those points of spacetime free of matter), this inability to tilt all the light cones so that they are all parallel is reflected in the non-vanishing of the Weyl tensor.

Languages / scripts used: Sumerian, Akkadian, Proto-Elamite, Ancient Greek, Russian, German, French, English

Acknowledgements
freesound.org; cdli.ucla.edu; The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL); Encylopaedia Britannica; arxiv.org; Zabelle Panosian – Groung (Crane) 1917

THE TABLET OF DESTINIES V: MELAMMU.TXT

Poems in Posthuman Akkadian
EPISODE 12/5

Episode 12/1 – NAM, FATE
Episode 12/2 – MAGNETAR.MELAMMU
Episode 12/3 – UHRN.MONDe
Episode 12/4 – NAM.TXT
Episode 12/6 – UHRN.TXT

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  THE TABLET OF DESTINIES  h e r e  (p.104 – 133)

Topics
Ninurta, The Tablet of Destinies, Magnetar, Boltzmann Brain, Entropy, Vacuum Structure, Arrow of Time

(…) soft gamma-ray repeaters
SGR 1806 – 20 ( MAGNETARcedilla )
SGR 1900 + 14 ( OGONEKpulsar )
traced backwards in time…

from MAGNETAR.MELAMMU / PPA

SGR 1806-20
is a magnetar, a type of neutron star with a very powerful magnetic field, that was discovered in 1979 and identified as a soft gamma repeater. SGR 1806-20 is located about 14.5 kiloparsecs (50,000 light-years) from Earth on the far side of the Milky Way galaxy in the constellation of Sagittarius. It has a diameter of no more than 20 kilometres (12 mi) and rotates on its axis every 7.5 seconds (30,000 km/h rotation speed at the surface). As of 2016, SGR 1806- 20 is the most highly magnetized object ever observed, with a magnetic field over 1015 gauss (G) (1011 tesla) in intensity (compared to the Sun’s 1–5 G and Earth’s 0.25–0.65 G).

Fifty thousand years after a starquake occurred on the surface of SGR 1806-20, the radiation from the resultant explosion reached Earth on December 27, 2004 (GRB 041227). In terms of gamma rays, the burst had an absolute magnitude around −291. It was the brightest event known to have been sighted on this planet from an origin outside the Solar System. The magnetar released more energy in onetenth of a second (1.0 Å~1040 J) than the Sun releases in 150,000 years (4 Å~1026 W Å~ 4.8 Å~1012 s = 1.85 Å~1039 J). Such a burst is thought to be the largest explosion observed in this galaxy by humans since the SN 1604 supernova observed by Johannes Kepler in 1604. The gamma rays struck Earth’s ionosphere and created more ionization, which briefly expanded the ionosphere. A similar blast within 3 parsecs (10 light years) of Earth would destroy the ozone layer and be similar in effect to a 12-kiloton nuclear blast at 7.5 kilometers. The nearest known magnetar to Earth is 1E 1048.1- 5937, located 9,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina.

SGR 1806-20 lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 and is a member of an open cluster named after it, itself a component of W31, one of the largest H II regions in the Milky Way. Cluster 1806-20 is made up of some highly unusual stars, including at least two carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet stars (WC9d and WCL), two blue hypergiants, and LBV 1806-20, one of the brightest/most massive stars in the galaxy.

SGR 1900+14
is a soft gamma repeater (SGR), located in the constellation of Aquila about 20,000 light-years away. It is assumed to be an example of an intensely magnetic star, known as a magnetar. It is thought to have formed after a fairly recent supernova explosion. An intense gamma-ray burst from this star was detected on August 27, 1998; shortly thereafter a new radio source appeared in that region of the sky. Despite the large distance to this SGR, estimated at 20,000 light years, the burst had large effects on the Earth’s atmosphere. The atoms in the ionosphere, which are usually ionized by the Sun’s radiation by day and recombine to neutral atoms by night, were ionized at nighttime at levels not much lower than the normal daytime level. The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), an X-ray satellite, received its strongest signal from this burst at this time, even though it was directed at a different part of the sky, and should normally have been shielded from the radiation. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope detected a mysterious ring around SGR 1900+14 at two narrow infrared frequencies in 2005 and 2007. The 2007 Spitzer image showed no discernible change in the ring after two years. The ring measures seven light-years across. The origin
of the ring is currently unknown.

Cedilla
A cedilla (/sɪˈdɪlə/ si-DILə; from Spanish), also known as cedilha (fromPortuguese) or cédille (from French), is a hook or tail (¸) added under certain letters as a diacritical mark to modify their pronunciation. In Catalan, French, and Portuguese, it is used only under the c, and the entire letter is called respectively c trencada (i.e. “broken C”), c cédille, and c cedilhado (or c cedilha, colloquially).

Ogonek
The ogonek (Polish:[ɔˈɡɔnɛk], “little tail”, the diminutive of ogon; Lithuanian: nosinė, “nasal”) is a diacritic hook placed under the lower right corner of a vowel in the Latin alphabet used in several European languages, and directly under a vowel in several Native American languages. An ogonek can also be attached to the top of a vowel in Old Norse- Icelandic to show length or vowel affection. For example, o᷎ represents imutated ø.

MELAMMU  

 
melim [SPLENDOUR] (Ur III, Old Babylonian)
me-lim4 “frightening splendour”
me-lem4=(awesome) radiance
Akk. melammu “fearsome radiance, aura”

Languages / scripts used: Sumerian, Akkadian, Proto-Elamite, Ancient Greek, Russian, German, French, English

Acknowledgements
freesound.org; cdli.ucla.edu; The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL); Encylopaedia Britannica; arxiv.org