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Early Instamatics
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 07

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #7

Livestream from Todessa

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Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Brecht, To Posterity
translated by H. R. Hays

1.
Indeed I live in the dark ages!
A guileless word is an absurdity. A smooth forehead betokens
A hard heart. He who laughs
Has not yet heard
The terrible tidings.

Ah, what an age it is
When to speak of trees is almost a crime
For it is a kind of silence about injustice!
And he who walks calmly across the street,
Is he not out of reach of his friends
In trouble?

It is true: I earn my living
But, believe me, it is only an accident.
Nothing that I do entitles me to eat my fill.
By chance I was spared. (If my luck leaves me
I am lost.)

They tell me: eat and drink. Be glad you have it!
But how can I eat and drink
When my food is snatched from the hungry
And my glass of water belongs to the thirsty?
And yet I eat and drink.

I would gladly be wise.
The old books tell us what wisdom is:
Avoid the strife of the world
Live out your little time
Fearing no one
Using no violence
Returning good for evil —
Not fulfillment of desire but forgetfulness
Passes for wisdom.
I can do none of this:
Indeed I live in the dark ages!

2.
I came to the cities in a time of disorder
When hunger ruled.
I came among men in a time of uprising
And I revolted with them.
So the time passed away
Which on earth was given me.

I ate my food between massacres.
The shadow of murder lay upon my sleep.
And when I loved, I loved with indifference.
I looked upon nature with impatience.
So the time passed away
Which on earth was given me.

In my time streets led to the quicksand.
Speech betrayed me to the slaughterer.
There was little I could do. But without me
The rulers would have been more secure. This was my hope.
So the time passed away
Which on earth was given me.

3.
You, who shall emerge from the flood
In which we are sinking,
Think —
When you speak of our weaknesses,
Also of the dark time
That brought them forth.

For we went,changing our country more often than our shoes.
In the class war, despairing
When there was only injustice and no resistance.

For we knew only too well:
Even the hatred of squalor
Makes the brow grow stern.
Even anger against injustice
Makes the voice grow harsh. Alas, we
Who wished to lay the foundations of kindness
Could not ourselves be kind.

But you, when at last it comes to pass
That man can help his fellow man,
Do no judge us
Too harshly.

WILLIAM BURROUGHS SINGS
ICH BIN VON KOPF BIS FUSS AUF LIEBE EINGESTELLT
(Friedrich Holländer)
Marlene Dietrich

Ein rätselhafter Schimmer,
Ein “je ne sais-pas-quoi”
Liegt in den Augen immer
Bei einer schönen Frau.
Doch wenn sich meine Augen
Bei einem vis-à-vis
Ganz tief in seine saugen
Was sprechen dann sie?:

Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß
Auf Liebe eingestellt,
Denn das ist meine Welt.
Und sonst gar nichts.
Das ist, was soll ich machen,
Meine Natur,
Ich kann halt lieben nur
Und sonst gar nichts.

Männer umschwirr’n mich,
Wie Motten um das Licht.
Und wenn sie verbrennen,
Ja dafür kann ich nicht.
Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß
Auf Liebe eingestellt,
Ich kann halt lieben nur
Und sonst gar nichts.

Was bebt in meinen Händen,
In ihrem heißen Druck?
Sie möchten sich verschwenden
Sie haben nie genug.
Ihr werdet mir verzeihen,
Ihr müßt’ es halt versteh’n,
Es lockt mich stets von neuem.
Ich find’ es so schön!

Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß
Auf Liebe eingestellt,
Denn das ist meine Welt,
Und sonst gar nichts.
Das ist, was soll ich machen,
Meine Natur,
Ich kann halt lieben nur
Und sonst gar nichts.

Männer umschwirr’n mich,
Wie Motten um das Licht.
Und wenn sie verbrennen,
Ja dafür kann ich nichts.
Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß
Auf Liebe eingestellt,
Ich kann halt lieben nur
Und sonst gar nichts.

FALLING IN LOVE AGAIN
(Frederick Hollander / Sammy Lerner)

Falling in love again
Never wanted to
What am I to do?
Can’t help it

Love’s always been my game
Play it as I may
I was born that way
Can’t help it

Men flock around me
Like moths around a flame
And if their wings burn
I know I’m not to blame

Falling in love again
Never wanted to
What am I to do?
Can’t help it

Love’s always been my game
Play it as I may
I was born that way
Can’t help it

Men flock around me
Like moths around a flame
And if their wings burn
I know I’m not to blame

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Bertolt Brecht, Marlene Dietrich, William Burroughs

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SWAN SONG

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN
Episode 16

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  SWAN SONG  h e r e  (p.150 – 170)

Topics
Tiamat, Marduk, Igigi Gods, Swan Song, Gamayun(Гамаюн), Aurorazhdarcho, Berimbau, Pensato, Proto-Elamite

Tiamat (goddess)
Tiamat is a personification of the primordial sea from which the gods were first created. She is also the main adversary of Marduk in the Enūma Eliš.

Functions
Tiamat’s exact functions as a goddess are difficult to establish. As her name indicates she was a deification of the primordial sea. Our best source of information for Tiamat is the myth Enūma Eliš, and in fact, there are only a handful of references to her outside of it. Enūma Eliš begins with a description of the two primeval seas, the salt sea Tiamat and the sweet sea Abzu, mingling their waters together to create the gods. In the following battle between Abzu and Ea, Tiamat attempts to appease Abzu and stop the conflict. But when she is later pressured by the lower gods to revenge him, she herself becomes the main antagonist of the story, creating an army of monsters led by her new consort, Qingu. She is ultimately defeated by Marduk, who incapacitates her with his “Evil Wind” and then kills her with an arrow. Marduk splits her in two, creating heaven and earth from her body, the Tigris and Euphrates from her eyes, mist from her spittle, mountains from her breasts and so on. Throughout the epic, there are differing descriptions of Tiamat: she appears both as a body of water, as a human figure, and as having a tail. These varying descriptions are ultimately reconciled as Marduk turns her limbs into geographical features.

Divine Genealogy and Syncretisms
In Enūma Eliš, Tiamat is the mother of all the gods. Together with Abzu she creates Lahmu and Lahamu, who in turn beget Anšar and Kišar. Though one cannot point to a syncretism as such, there are several models for Tiamat in the earlier mythology. Katz argues that the figure of Tiamat unites two strands of tradition attached to the sea. The first is the motherly figure of Namma, who is also referred to as a primeval ocean from which the gods were created. The other is the figure of the sea as a monstrous adversary, like the Levantine god Yamm. Another important influence for the figure of Tiamat is Anzu, a mythical bird defeated by Ninurta, indeed the battle between Marduk and Tiamat has a number of parallels to the battle between Ninurta and Anzu.

Cult Place(s)
There was no cult dedicated directly to Tiamat, but the battle between Tiamat and Marduk played an important role in the New Year’s festival in Babylon. The Enūma Eliš was recited on its fourth day, and some argue that the festival included a symbolic reenactment of the mythological battle.

Time Periods Attested
The oldest attestation of Tiamat is an Old Akkadian incantation, though there are few other references to her until the first millenium BCE. After the composition of the Enūma Eliš, Tiamat is found in a number of theological commentary works, but most of these seem to rely on the epic.

Name and Spellings
The name Tiamat is uncontracted form of the word tâmtu, meaning “sea”. The long vowel â is contracted from the short vowels i and a. The word is in the “absolute state,” a noun form that is equivalent to the vocative (a grammatical case which directly invokes or addresses a person or deity; literally the name means “O, sea!”).
The AMGG project / Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses /

Igigi/Igigu (a group of gods)
This Semitic term describes a group of possibly seven or eight gods. It is likely that the god Marduk was one of them, but the total membership in this group is unclear and likely changed over time.

In the prologue to the famous Code of Hammurabi it is indicated that the Anunnaki elevated the god Marduk among the Igigu gods but it is difficult to assess the significance of this passage.
Some mythological texts, such as the Anzu myth, speak of an assembly of the Igigu gods, but whether this might be an institutionalized assembly remains doubtful.

Other gods who may belong to this group are Ištar, Asarluhi, Naramṣit, Ninurta, Nuska, and Šamaš.

The term Igigu is first attested in texts from the Old Babylonian period and only occurs in Akkadian contexts. A Sumerian logographic equivalent of the term Igigu is nun-gal-e-ne, to be translated as “the great princes/sovereigns.”

Because this term describes a group of gods, there are no known images of the Igigu. / The AMGG project / Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses /
The AMGG project / Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses /

Gamayun(Гамаюн)
In literary sources of 17th – 19th centuries, Gamayun was described as a bird that occasionally flies from heaven to earthly skies, has no legs and no wings, and hovers only with the help of her gorgeous long tail. Later on, her image underwent a certain change and was depicted having legs, wings and also a woman’s face.
To some people, like Russian artist Viktor Vasnetsov and poet Alexander Block, Gamayun was closely connected with the ideas of blissfulness and happiness. But she was often perceived as a bad sign. This bird almost never descends to the ground and if she does fall, death will soon come to a member of a royal family. This is why Gamayun has also earned a reputation of a bird of sorrow. It is likely that this creature came to slavic culture from Iran. Their mythology has legends about a bird “huma”, who brings power to those over whose head she passes.

Aurorazhdarcho
was a pterosaur, a type of flying reptile. Aurorazhdarcho lived during the Late Jurassic and resided in Europe.

Berimbau
Brazilian musical bow, made of wood. Most instruments are just under 5 feet (1.5 metres) long, and they are strung with a single metal wire, called an arame, that is typically drawn from an old truck or automobile tire. A dried, hollowed, open-backed gourd resonator—called a cabaça—is attached to the instrument near its lower end; the resonator is held in place by a loop of string that passes through the top of the gourd and around both the wood and the wire of the bow.
When it is played, the berimbau is held in an upright position—usually in the left hand—with the open back of the gourd against the stomach. The little finger of the supporting hand is slipped under the string that secures the gourd to the bow, while the ring and middle fingers are wrapped around the wooden pole just above the gourd. The index finger and thumb manipulate the dobrão, a thick metal disc or smooth stone that is pressed against the wire to generate different sounds during performance. Held in the other hand are a thin stick, roughly 12 inches (30 cm) long, called a baqueta, and a small rattle, called a caxixí.
Using the baqueta to strike the wire of the berimbau and the dobrão and cabaça to control the instrument’s pitch, timbre, and resonance, the berimbau player generates an array of discrete rhythms known as toques. These toques are built from a combination of three fundamental sounds: a low pitch produced by the open wire; a higher pitch produced by stopping the wire firmly with the dobrão; and a nonpitched buzz, generated by allowing the dobrão to rest lightly against the wire when it is struck. Resonance and timbre are controlled by strategically pulling the gourd toward and away from the stomach. Meanwhile, the rattle underscores the strong beats of each rhythmic pattern. / Britannica /

Pensato
In music, a pensato (Italian:”thought”) is composed imaginary note, a written note which is neither played nor heard.
Anton Webern is credited by some with the first use of pensatos, while others argue he did not use them at all.

Languages / scripts used: English, French, German, Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin, Proto-Elamite

Acknowledgements
Georg Philipp Telemann – „Schwanengesang 1733“ / Schlick, Georg, Pregardien, Schwarz, La Stagione, Schneider
Franz Schubert, „Schwanengesang“ – 12. Heinrich Heine “Am Meer“ / Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Gerald Moore
Naná Vasconcelos,Jacob Dahl,freesound.org

Innocent Colors
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 06

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #6

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Veronica Lake, Vittorio Mussolini, Georg Türke, Anneliese Uhlig, Ezra Pound / Canto XLV

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Duck and Cover
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 05

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #5

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Bert the Turtle

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The Global Player
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 04

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #4

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
archive.org, Velimir Khlebnikov – The Radio of the Future (1921)

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The President´s Address
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 03

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #3

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Benito Mussolini

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Space Monkey
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 02

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #2

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org, Adorno/Horkheimer

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Leader News
TODESSA SEASON 02, EPISODE 01

TODESSA LEADER NEWS
ALWAYS FROM YESTERDAY
Issue #1

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, archive.org

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REFUGIUM

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN
Episode 15

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  REFUGIUM  h e r e  (p.141 – 150)

Topics
Das Haus des Seins, Baba Yaga

Das Haus des Seins
Das Denken vollbringt den Bezug des Seins zum Wesen des Menschen. Es macht und bewirkt diesen Bezug nicht. Das Denken bringt ihn nur als das, was ihm selbst vom Sein übergeben ist, dem Sein dar. Dieses Darbieten besteht darin, daß im Denken das Sein zur Sprache kommt. Die Sprache ist das Haus des Seins. In ihrer Behausung wohnt der Mensch. Die Denkenden und Dichtenden sind die Wächter dieser Behausung. Ihr Wachen ist das Vollbringen der Offenbarkeit des Seins, insofern sie diese durch ihr Sagen zur Sprache bringen und in der Sprache aufbewahren. Das Denken wird nicht erst dadurch zur Aktion, daß von ihm eine Wirkung ausgeht oder daß es angewendet wird. Das Denken handelt, indem es denkt. Dieses Handeln ist vermutlich das Einfachste und zugleich Höchste, weil es den Bezug des Seins zum Menschen angeht.

Heidegger: Brief über den Humanismus. 1947

Thinking accomplishes the relation of being to the essence of the human being. It does not make or cause the relation. Thinking brings this relation to being solely as something handed over to thought itself from being. Such offering consists in the fact that in thinking being comes to language. Language is the house of being. In its home human beings dwell. Those who think and those who create with words are the guardians of this home. Their guardianship accomplishes the manifestation of being insofar as they bring this manifestation to language and preserve it in language through their saying. Thinking does not become action only because some effect issues from it or because it is applied. Thinking acts insofar as it thinks. Such action ispresumably the simplest and at the same time the highest because it concerns the relation of being to humans.

Letter on “Humanism”
Translated by Frank A. Capuzzi’

Baba Yaga
Baba-Yaga (Russian: Баба Яга) in Russian folklore, an ogress who steals, cooks, and eats her victims, usually children. A guardian of the fountains of the water of life, she lives with two or three sisters (all known as Baba-Yaga) in a forest hut which spins continually on birds’ legs; her fence is topped with human skulls. Baba-Yaga can ride through the air—in an iron kettle or in a mortar that she drives with a pestle—creating tempests as she goes. She often accompanies Death on his travels, devouring newly released souls.
Encyclopaedia Britannica

Languages / scripts used: English, French, German, Russian, Ancient Greek, Latin

Acknowledgements
freesound.org, Heidegger, Mussorgsky, Richter

GRAPHÈMES

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN
Episode 14

Livestream from Todessa

Camera: Tman
Cast: Totleb & Co.
Editor: Todito
Soundmix: Todonsky Junior
Directed by: T.L.

POEMS IN POSTHUMAN AKKADIAN

written by General Totleben
© Ivan Stanev, executor testamentarius

Read the full text of the poem  GRAPFÈMES  h e r e  (p.133 – 140)

Topics
Proto-Elamite, Capriccio

Proto-Elamite
Proto-Elamite uses no word-dividers, and the entries are not arranged in boxes. In actuality, a proto-Elamite text is arranged sequentially and not in any visible order of hierarchies. This in-line representation of the entries is quite different from all other early writing systems, and it may carry certain elements of language coding (cf. Damerow 1999, 7). The entries can cover all surfaces, and can run from one line to the next and from one surface onto the next. Each entry consists of a string of graphemes and a numerical notation. Most of the strings of signs in the proto-Elamite corpus are of modest length (2 – 6 signs), but some longer strings exist.
The header and subscript are not followed by numerical notations. In conventioinal transliterations of proto-Elamite texts, each entry is given its own line-number, and its two constituent parts are separated by a comma. As a rule the right edge is considered part of the obverse, and only the first entry to start on the reverse is numbered as belonging to the reverse. When the text of the obverse runs onto the reverse, that segment of the reverse is called column 1, the segment holding the total (if present) is called column 2. If there is no spill-over from the obverse the total (if present) is coded reverse, column 1. Normally, the tablet is rotated 180 degrees on its horizontal axis to write the total (deviations occur), and 180 degrees around its vertical axis for a continuation of the text.
Complex Graphemes in Proto-Elamite / Jacob L. Dahl

Capriccio
In the plastic arts, Capriccio is generally an architectural fantasy, where buildings, archaeological remains, ruins and other architectural elements are composed of combinations of real and fantastic elements arranged according to the idiosyncratic criteria of the artist. Traditionally, caprice used to be a subgenre of landscape painting, but with the passage of time it was also used to designate other types of works in which fantasy prevails.

The whim or “veduta ideata” in Venetian painting between the end of the seventeenth and the beginning of the eighteenth century is configured as a real genre, that is as the art of composing the landscape through the free combination of real or fantastic architectural elements, ruins of antiquity reworked, figures and figures, according to a variety of declinations ranging from the grotesque to the visionary, from the picturesque all’elegìaco.

In the Italian art historian Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574), the term capriccio refers to the traits of puzzling fantasy testifying to the originality of a painter. Speaking of Filippino Lippi, he emphasizes the “strani capricci che egli espress nella pittura” (the “strange caprices that he expresses in his paintings”). Raffaello Borghini (Il Riposo, 15844) distinguishes between an inspiration drawn from others and that intrinsic to the artist: a suo capriccio.

As early as the 17th century, Viviano Codazzi, in Rome, produced architectural paintings, which represent imaginary ruins, as can be seen in his architectural Fantasies of the Pitti Palace.

Towards the end of the seventeenth century, Philip Baldinucci (Vocabolario dell’arte del disegno, 16815) finally defined capriccio as a work born from the spontaneous imagination of the painter (improvvisa). The meaning of caprice becomes metonymic by referring to the work itself, not to the whimsical idea that produced it.
Golden Age:
Early practitioners of the genre who made the genre popular in mid-17th century Rome included Alessandro Salucci and Viviano Codazzi. The artists represent two different approaches to the genre: Codazzi’s capricci were more realistic than those of Salucci who showed more creativity and liberty in his approach by rearranging Roman monuments to fit his compositional objectives. The ‘quadratture’ frescoes of Agostino Tassi and the urban views of Claude Lorrain and Herman van Swanevelt, which he saw in Rome, may have stimulated Viviano Codazzi to start painting capricci.

This genre was perfected[citation needed] by Marco Ricci (1676–1730) but its best-known proponent was the artist Giovanni Paolo Pannini (1691–1765). This style was extended in the 1740s by Canaletto in his etched vedute ideali, and works by Piranesi and his imitators.
In the eighteenth century, the term takes on the particular meaning of fictional landscape among vedute painters. In the 1720s, Marco Ricci (1676-1730) drew numerous paintings and prints depicting landscapes with ruins and staffing. In Rome, Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765) is a forerunner of the neo-classical movement with its views that depict the city and scenes of ancient ruins, in which are incorporated non-existent details but contributing to the atmosphere evoked. In Venice the genre of capricci is especially appreciated by the Venetians themselves, amused by the painter’s ingenious play with architecture. In the 1740s, Canaletto published a series of capricci prints, the Vedute Ideals.

Michele Marieschi (1710-1743) lends itself to the freedoms of capriccio with the representation of the staircase of an inner palace courtyard. It is based on at least thirteen versions of motifs inspired by Marco Ricci’s drawings of stage sets to give his composition a theatrical perspective. His Capriccio con edificio gotico ed obelisco (1741) shows a fantasized Venice, with a Gothic portico and an obelisk pointing to a pier, and in the background, reliefs of hills and mountains leaning against waterside houses.

The term can be used more broadly for other works with a strong element of fantasy. The Capricci, an influential series of etchings by Gianbattista Tiepolo (1730s?, published in 1743), reduced the architectural elements to chunks of classical statuary and ruins, among which small groups made up of a cast of exotic and elegant figures of soldiers, philosophers and beautiful young people go about their enigmatic business. No individual titles help to explain these works; mood and style are everything. A later series was called Scherzi di fantasia – “Fantastic Sketches”. His son Domenico Tiepolo was among those who imitated these prints, often using the term in titles.

Goya’s series of eighty prints Los Caprichos, and the last group of prints in his series The Disasters of War, which he called “caprichos enfáticos” (“emphatic caprices”), are far from the spirit of light-hearted fantasy the term usually suggests. They take Tiepolo’s format of a group of figures, now drawn from contemporary Spanish life, and are a series of savage satires and comments on its absurdity, only partly explicated by short titles.

Capricci, series of etchings by Giambattista Tiepolo (1743), reduce the architectural elements to pieces of classical statuary and ruins, among which small groups – soldiers, philosophers, young people – conduct their business. No individual titles explain these works. A later series is called Scherzi di Fantasia, “Fantastic Drawings”.

The series of 80 prints of Francisco de Goya, Los caprichos, and the last set of his Disasters of the war that names caprichos enfáticos (“emphatic whims”), take again the format of the groups of personages initiated by Tiepolo, placed in the Contemporary Spanish life, to produce a succession of satires and comments on his nonsense, only partially explained by their short title.

Later examples include A Tribute to Sir Christopher Wren (circa 1838) and A Professor’s Dream by Charles Robert Cockerell, and Joseph Gandy’s Public and Private Buildings Executed by Sir John Soane (1818).

In architecture, a whim is an extravagant, frivolous or funny building, designed more as an artistic expression than for practical purposes. However, very few whims were originally completely devoid of practical utility: usually, over time, they stopped being used, as in the case of hunting towers.

The whims are usually found in the parks and on the land surrounding large villas and castles. Some have been deliberately built to look in ruins. The whims were particularly in vogue between the late sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Nowadays theme parks and world fairs often contain buildings similar to whims (just to give an example, the gigantic fairytale castle at Disneyland); these structures, however, are built for the purpose of attracting and entertaining visitors.

Languages / scripts used: Proto-Elamite, English, French, German, Russian

Acknowledgements
Jacob L. Dahl